Plastic crabs on the beach?

It’s the end of your first day at the beach. You’re a bit sunburnt but you had a lot of fun. Now it’s time to put away the chairs and towels, put on your t-shirt and share a cocktail as the BBQ is warming up. Wait a minute… Before you go, are you sure that you’ve not forgetton anything? Look around to ensure that your kids don’t leave behind one or two of their beach toys. Do you really think that a small plastic crab doesn’t matter? Think again because more than 43,000 beach toys were found in 2017 by the volunteers of the international coastal cleanup. Because of this crap mentality, we harm the marine life as these lost plastic toys take up to 1,000 years to decompose. Can you imagine having microscopic plastic pieces in your plate coming from Vikings’ toys? Well, it’ll happen to future generations…

Additionally, we can only keep reminding you that those toys are made of plastic. So, their manufacture requires oil, pollutes water and emits some crabon of dioxide. Alright, you might feel like a beached whale because of your distracted kids. In that case, why not buy used beach toys or wooden toys instead of buying a brand-new set?

A trick dedicated to the Saquish crew

YOUR ENVIRONMENTAL SAVINGS*

When you don’t buy a brand-new beach plastic toy set, you help to save approximately:
  • 422g of plastic
  • 59.5 fl oz / 1.76 liters of oil (manufacturing of plastic materials and shipment)
  • 25.89 gal. / 98 liters of water (oil extraction)
  • 402 kW of power (manufacturing and packaging)
  • 2.58lb / 1.17kg of CO2 equivalent (power production, oil extraction, and shipment)
  • 276.6 ft2 / 25.7 m2 ecological footprint (virtual forest required to absorb CO2 emissions)
  • 2 to 30 US dollars / 1.5 to 15 euros

These figures do not include the quantity of water polluted by the decomposition of the toys into nanoparticles of plastic. The reference set includes 8 pieces: watering can, bucket, sieve, rake, shovel and 3 sand molds.

(*) These data are statistically estimated for personal use only. Any use for scientific, business or legal purposes is strongly discouraged.

Learn more: https://www.treehugger.com/slideshows/ocean-conservation/weirdest-trash-has-been-found-beaches/?utm_content=bufferb8624&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer#slide-top https://oceanconservancy.org/trash-free-seas/plastics-in-the-ocean/ https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181219115557.htm https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/food-microplastics-eating-plastic-pollution-environment-a8395556.html

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.